In Afghanistan, Fighting The Taliban Increasingly Involves Covert Operations

In Afghanistan, Fighting The Taliban Increasingly Involves Covert Operations

The U.S. has been fighting in Afghanistan since shortly after 9/11, ousting the Taliban and their harsh interpretation of Islam from power that fall. But the insurgent group as which it reformed has plagued Afghanistan with violence ever since. Now, the w
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This Wilderness Survival Program Offers A Chance To Live As The Cavemen Did

This Wilderness Survival Program Offers A Chance To Live As The Cavemen Did

For those tired of the stresses and excesses of contemporary civilization, a survival expert in the Italian Alps offers a training program in living as the Neanderthals did. Participants endure a rough existence in the wilderness, learning to kill prey fo
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Why Cambodian Orphanages House So Many Children Whose Parents Are Still Alive

Why Cambodian Orphanages House So Many Children Whose Parents Are Still Alive

The concept of orphanages has long been considered outdated in developed countries. In the developing world, however, these institutions still house hundreds of thousands of children. But the surprising reality is that the parents of most of these childre
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Why Millennials Are Moving Away From Large Urban Centers

Why Millennials Are Moving Away From Large Urban Centers

For years, rural areas and small towns consistently lost some of their most talented young people, who moved to urban centers. But recent census data indicates that this “brain drain” phenomenon is subsiding.
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Blockbuster Da Vinci Exhibition Showcases The Master's ‘Endless Curiosity’

Blockbuster Da Vinci Exhibition Showcases The Master's ‘Endless Curiosity’

The blockbuster exhibit of the year celebrates Leonardo da Vinci, 500 years after his death. People are flocking to the Louvre Museum in Paris to see the work of the master, who was born in Italy, died in France and personified the expression Renaissance
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David Rubenstein's Take On What American History Can Teach Our Politicians

David Rubenstein's Take On What American History Can Teach Our Politicians

In 2013, billionaire investor, businessman and philanthropist David Rubenstein set out an ambitious plan to moderate conversations with prominent historians before an audience of bipartisan lawmakers. The goal: help members of Congress become more knowled
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How Fiction Draws Pulitzer-Winner Elizabeth Strout Home To Maine

How Fiction Draws Pulitzer-Winner Elizabeth Strout Home To Maine

Olive Kitteridge is overbearing and hard to love, as well as complicated and compelling. The character at the center of Elizabeth Strout's 2009 Pulitzer-winning novel is also back -- in a new book called Olive, Again. Strout takes Jeffrey Brown on a tour
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Firearms Museum Takes Aim At Understanding History, Culture Of Guns

Firearms Museum Takes Aim At Understanding History, Culture Of Guns

Wyoming is the least populous state in the U.S. but ranks near the top in per capita gun ownership. It's also home to the nation's most comprehensive collection of historical firearms. Jeffrey Brown reports from Cody, where a renovated firearms museum tra
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Why Flint Residents Are Still Dealing With Water Worries, 5 Years After Lead Crisis

Why Flint Residents Are Still Dealing With Water Worries, 5 Years After Lead Crisis

Since 2014, Flint, Michigan, has been synonymous with tainted water. Five years on, not all of the city's residents have access to safe water. Some wait for hours in line to obtain bottled water, while others deal with the physical and emotional fallout o
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Flint Fights Lead Poisoning With Farmers Markets And Cooking Classes

Flint Fights Lead Poisoning With Farmers Markets And Cooking Classes

After a public health crisis in Flint, Michigan, triggered by high levels of lead in the drinking water, a number of programs are working to encourage good nutrition for children in order to prevent recurring effects of the neurotoxin on growing bodies. J
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How These Employers Are Adapting To The Needs Of An Aging Workforce

How These Employers Are Adapting To The Needs Of An Aging Workforce

As the population ages and older workers are making up more and more of the labor force, some employers are taking notice and adjusting their own practices to retain valuable experience and skills. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has the story.
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How This Community College Is Preparing Students For Careers In Aviation

How This Community College Is Preparing Students For Careers In Aviation

According to Boeing, 800,000 new pilots will be needed worldwide over the next 20 years. In Bend, Oregon, a community college is preparing students to resolve this critical need -- and cultivate their own career success. Special correspondent Cat Wise rep
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